Silver
CAMPAIGN
Unitec Takes The Classroom To The People In 360 Video
AGENCY
Republik
CLIENT
Unitec New Zealand
BRAND
Unitec New Zealand
DETAILS
The technology revolution is forcing businesses to adapt faster than ever.
 
Unlike Universities, Unitec’s hands-on learning approach provides relevant courses and adaptive thinking skills that meet the urgent demands of business today.
 
The problem in 2016 was that many people saw Unitec as inferior to University.
 
The result was a steady decline in enrolments.
 
Following the successful 2015 launch of their brand proposition ‘Think. Do. Unitec.’, the 2016 objective was to build on launch momentum and increase enrolments.
 
As an evolution of ‘Think.Do’, the ‘Looks Like A Classroom To Us’ launch in 2016 challenged outdated perceptions by showcasing Unitec’s progressive learning environments using innovative digital technology.
 
Our strategy put 360 video at the campaign’s heart because: 
  1. Its immersive capabilities enabled people to experience Unitec’s learning approach firsthand.
  2. Using emerging technology demonstrated that Unitec is progressive and at the forefront of technology and learning trends.
  3. No one else in the tertiary sector was using 360-video technology. 
Leading with innovative digital technology, Unitec’s ‘Looks Like A Classroom To Us’ campaign increased both 2017 applications and public perceptions.   
 
CAMPAIGN
Correcting History
AGENCY
TBWASantiago Mangada Puno
CLIENT
Campaign Against the Return of the Marcoses to Malacañang (CARMMA)
BRAND
Public Awareness and Petition
DETAILS
In 1972, Philippine President Ferdinand Marcos declares Martial Law, setting forth the bloodiest era the country has ever experienced.
 
In Feb. 1986, Philippine People Power oust the Marcos Family.
 
By Nov. 1991, the Marcos family is allowed back to the country from exile.
 
30 years later, his son, Ferdinand Marcos, Jr., is the vice presidential favorite during the 2016 National Elections due to his popularity with a new generation: the Millenials, 40% of the voting population.
 
The Millennials remain ignorant about the atrocities of Martial Law because their school textbooks, published during Marcos years, were never revised to reflect the truth.
 
To counter misinformation and fill in the gap, we needed to educate the youth and furthermore, create urgency for the authorities to take action and revise history curriculum in schools.
 
Thus the birth of Correcting History, a social experiment turned online video that exposed the truth about Martial Law victims to Millennials to ensure that history would not repeat itself.
 
We tied up with CARMMA, a community of Martial Law survivors, and invited them to disguise as reporters and interview Millennials about Martial Law. Afterwards, they revealed their identity and recounted their experiences of imprisonment, torture and rape.
 
We recorded the actual encounter of Millennials hearing the truth for the first time and tactically released the footage on a platform where they access information, express opinions and identify themselves – Facebook. We used our millennial respondents’ reaction to instigate action from other Millennials.
 
The online video was strategically uploaded exactly a week before elections to influence their voting decision. In addition, the video also asked the public to petition the Department of Education to revise Filipino history books.
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